The Inevitable Change of the Open Internet

As the FCC has finally made it's vote, Internet Providers across the country are beginning to lash out, or embrace, the Open Internet. The Federal Communications Commission sanction the strategy known as internet fairness by a 3-2 vote at its Thursday meeting, with FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler saying the arrangement will guarantee "that nobody - whether government or corporate - ought to control free open access to the Internet." The disagreeing votes originated from Michael O'Rielly and Ajut Pai, Republicans who cautioned that the FCC was violating its power and meddling in business to tackle an issue that doesn't exist. They additionally griped that the measure's 300 or more pages weren't openly discharged or straightforwardly faced off regarding.

Saying the FCC was seizing power in "a radical flight" from its prior approaches. Official Ajut Pai, a Republican, talked against the proposition. He blamed the FCC for "failing Internet flexibility."


After the voting, the FCC took a closer look at options to rename broadband to increase more extensive administrative forces. It will now treat Internet administration suppliers as transporters under Title II of the Telecommunications Act, which controls benefits as open utilit. This is what has to be done in order to preserve the power of the Open Internet Order. We cannot allow the current major American ISPs to re-take what we have fought so hard for. The FCC's vote was just a single stepping stone that has put us on the right path. Wasting millions of dollars, the lobbying groups controlled by those ISPs are looking for a fight; there's no doubt in anyone's mind that they will begin filing suit as soon as possible. This merely shows their desperation. While they make claims to supporting the Open Internet they are in fact working very hard against the change that is going to happen.

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The Tangled Knot of American Energy

As a new resident of Texas, I'm incredibly surprised by how many electric companies there are available in the state. Back home we only had 1 for the city which meant we were practically beholden to them even if they decided to up the prices - which they always inevitably did at some point. A friend of mine directed me to energyproviderstexas.com which helped me choose which provider was going to be the best fit in my area. I've got to admit that I love the idea of being able to switch providers if the any one of them suddenly becomes more expensivbe than I am willing to pay!

It makes me wonder why other states haven't been able to create such a viable and flourishing infrastructure as Texas has managed to do. Oh, there's no doubt that the abundance of natural resources found here in the Lone Star State is no doubt partially responsible for the progressive energy model they've established but I believe it's also in part of the nature of the state and how businesses are governed here. No matter the model, competition is a healthy and necessary part of any economy. It's best for the businesses as well as the customers they are providing to.

Energy in the United States is such a fasctining topic! I've really considered delving more into the subject merely for a glimpse of insight into the inner workings of the American energy infrastructure. It's become even more interesting as we begin to employ fracking in order to untangle ourselves from the dependency of foreign oil despite OPEC's manipulation of the market. They are clearly attempting to put American business owners out of a job. How this is legal or why our government doesn't do something about it is beyond my simple understanding.

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